Why Play a Fantasy Football Rotisserie League?

Most people who’ve played fantasy football are familiar with the idea of a head-to-head league: your team of players goes head-to-head against another league team that week; your squad gets a win, loss, or a tie, and then you move on to the next week. The best record at the end of the regular season in each division makes playoffs, and so on. But you may not be aware that there’s another interesting option out there: Rotisserie leagues.

Here’s how Rotisserie leagues work. Each week your players accumulate stats in a variety of different statistical categories, and those stats are added to your category totals moving forward throughout the year. Highest scorer in a 12-team league at the end of the year in each category, such as Rushing Yards, gets 12 points and the second-highest scorer gets 11 points, and so on. Then, in Receiving Yards, the highest scorer gets 12 points, just like with Rushing Yards. The categories (Rushing Yards, Receiving Yards, Passing Touchdowns, and many more) are determined by the League Commissioner at the beginning of the year, and the winner of the league is the team owner who’s accumulated the most final category points at the end of the year.

Rotisserie Leagues vs. Head-to-Head Leagues Does this scoring system seem odd? Rotisserie leagues are definitely a different way of thinking about fantasy football, but some analysis of the differences may give you a real interest in this alternative. There are several points worth considering.

1. Basement owners still have a chance to win. In a head-to-head league, if you’ve ever been the team whose team loses its first 3 or 4 games of the season, you know it can be tough to stay motivated throughout the year. This situation is much less of a problem in a Rotisserie league.

2. Players get traded more often. In a head-to-head league, certain players WILL NOT GET TRADED throughout the year. The owner simply counts on that player too much for points, and wants to ride that player the whole year. Good luck trying to get Tom Brady, Adrian Peterson, Randy Moss, or Jason Witten away from their respective owners in a head-to-head league. However, in a Rotisserie league, owners will sometimes be ahead enough in one category (say Rushing Yards), but down enough in another (say Catches) to want to trade their best players for good players in other categories.

3. Tough divisions don’t kill average teams. If you’re the average team www.ufabet in a head-to-head league division with 2 stud squads, you’re not likely to make the playoffs. You have to play the stud squads twice, and you’re likely going to be too far down in the win department to catch a wild card slot. However, in a Rotisserie league, this simply isn’t a problem: you’re playing for Rotisserie in various categories throughout the year, not head-to-head victories and there are no Divisions.